Posts

Working with an Estate Planning Lawyer

You’ve finally decided that you are ready to put together an estate plan (preparation of wills, trusts, and power of attorneys etc.) but are not sure about what the process will involve.

Here’s a quick list of some items that you should be prepared for:

Get specific about your assets

  • There’s no estate plan without discussing financials. All assets need to be considered and reviewed along with designations which may need to be changed, updated, or revised. These include not only your home, investments, shares, or bank accounts but also things like life insurance policies, registered plans etc. Not giving these items attention could lead to problems.

Get clear on what you want

  • Who should inherit your assets after you pass away?
  • Who should be looking after your affairs (funeral, debts, taxes, administration and distribution).
  • Who is the best suited to look after your minor or dependent children?
  • Should you consider an insurance trust agreement in order to provide further protection?
  • Are certain life-interest trusts or spousal trusts (possibly in a second-marriage scenario) required to further protect what you’ve earned and to ensure that not only is your spouse is protected during his or her lifetime but the capital of the trust is reserved for other persons?

Get the right opinion

  • You likely have some thoughts on your plan and who it should benefit but aren’t sure about the right way of bringing them to life. The best way to sort out is to speak to a professional (lawyer, financial advisor, and accountant) with a focus in this area. An opinion from a qualified professional is invaluable in making the decisions that suit your needs and protect your assets.

Get writing

  • Generally, the first step is for you to fill out a questionnaire to provide personal information in order for us to be able to assess your needs and tailor the plan accordingly.

The above is only a general idea of what is involved. Feel free to call us to get the process underway.

Disclaimer: The above is for informational purposes only and does not serve as legal advice. Please speak to your lawyer to better assess your specific situation and estate planning needs.

Net Family Property and Equalization: An Introduction

Equalization is a payment from one spouse to the other at the end of a marriage.  This equalization payment ONLY applies to married spouses, not to common law spouses.  S. 5(1) of the Family Law Act (“FLA“) provides for Equalization when:

  1. A divorce is granted;
  2. Marriage is declared a nullity;
  3. When (married) spouses are separated and there is no reasonable prospect they will resume cohabitation.

One thing I often hear clients ask is whether they have to split 50% of everything.  While somewhat true, it is not entirely accurate.  The real definition of division according to s. 5(1) of the FLA is as follows: “the spouse whose net family property is the lesser of the two net family properties is entitled to a one-half difference between them”.

In simpler terms, separated spouses are entitled to 50% of the value of the marriage.  So how is that value determined?

 

Marriage and Valuation Date

First we need to understand what Net Family Property (“NFP”) is and how to calculate it.  S. 4(1) of the Family Law Act defines NFP as all property that a spouse owns on the valuation date (i.e. separation date) after deducting:

  1. Debts and other liabilities; and
  2. Value of property OTHER THAN A MATRIMONIAL HOME owned on date of marriage.

Therefore we have two dates that are important in determining equalization:

  1. The valuation date; and
  2. The date of marriage.

The date of marriage is simply the date you got married and does not include any cohabitation before marriage.  Spousal support may factor in cohabitation periods before marriage however.  See our post on spousal support for more info by clicking here.

The Valuation date is essentially the date the marriage ended, or the date the parties separated.  It is defined under s. 4(1) of the FLA as:

  1. The date you separate;
  2. Date the divorce is granted;
  3. Date marriage is a nullity;
  4. Date one of the spouses commences an application based on improvident depletion that is subsequently granted; or
  5. Date before the date on which one of the spouses dies leaving the other spouse surviving.

Once we have those two dates, we can begin figuring out how much your Net Family Property (“NFP”) is.

 

Calculating Net Family Property for Equalization

When determining the Net Family Property (“NFP”) of persons who are ending their marriage, we need to look at two important dates: the marriage date and the valuation date.

Let’s pick two dates to help figure out the NFP:

  1. Jane and John married on October 1, 2010;
  2. Separated on February 1, 2018.

That’s almost 8 years of marriage.  You’ll see here that February 1, 2018 is the date of separation, which fits under the definition of Valuation date in s. 4(1) of the FLA.

Now, we take the value of all assets that both parties own on the valuation date, subtract their debts owned at valuation, and finally subtract the value of any property owned on the marriage date.

JOHN

John’s Assets on Valuation Date Car – $25,000

Personal Bank Account – $3,000

$4,000 in Joint account with Jane (50%) – $2,000

Investment Account ending in 1010 – $170,000

 Total = $200,000

John’s Debts on Valuation Date Loan from Friend – $50,000

Total = $50,000

Property Owned at Marriage Investment Account ending in 1010 – $100,000

Total = $100,000

Calculate Final Total

Assets

– Debts

– Property at marriage

 

$200,000

-$50,000

-$100,000

John’s NFP $50,000 

JANE

Jane’s Assets on Valuation Date Car – $20,000

Personal Bank Account – $2,000

$4,000 in Joint account with John (50%) – $2,000

RRSP – $6,000

Matrimonial Home – $320,000

Total = $350,000

Jane’s Debts on Valuation Date Line of Credit – $50,000

Mortgage – $100,000

Total = $150,000

Property Owned at Marriage Matrimonial Home – $220,000

Total = $220,000

Calculate final total:

Assets

– Debts

– Property at marriage

 

$350,000

-$150,000

can’t subtract Mat Home

Jane’s NFP $200,000 

So, something interesting happened here.  Jane’s name is the only one on title to the home and it was valued at $220,000 when they got married.  She should be able to deduct that home from the valuation date value right?

Wrong.

Remember, you subtract property owned at the date of marriage from your valuation date EXCEPT for the matrimonial home.  So Jane has to include the entire value of the home regardless of how much it was worth at marriage.

We’re almost there.  The language of the equalization rule is: “the spouse whose net family property is the lesser of the two net family properties is entitled to a one-half difference between them.”

 

EQUALIZATION

Jane’s NFP

– John’s NFP

$200,000

-$50,000

$150,000
Difference divided by 2 $150,000/2
Equalization Payment or, the one half difference $75,000

In this instance John, who is the lesser of the two net family properties, is entitled to the one half difference between them, $75,000.

Therefore Jane makes an equalization payment of $75,000 to John.  With that, John would have $125,000 and Jane would have $125,000.  They are equalized.

 

Additional Exclusions

You also have the ability to exclude other property on the valuation date other than just debts under S. 4(2) of the Family Law Act.

These include things such as:

  • Property acquired by gift or inheritance after marriage date
  • Income from property that was gifted or inherited if donor EXPRESSLY stated it is to be excluded from NFP
  • Damages from a settlement resulting from personal injuries, nervous shock, mental distress, or loss of guidance care and companionship
  • Proceeds or right to proceeds of life insurance policy payable on death of insured
  • Property OTHER THAN MATRIMONIAL HOME into which property above can be traced
  • Property both spouses agree not to include as a result of a domestic contract (see our post on separation agreements for more info)
  • Unadjusted pensionable earnings under Canada Pension Plan

If you’re thinking of separating and want help to ensure you are properly protected, contact Rabideau Law to see how we may assist.

Spousal Support: The Spousal Support Advisory Guidelines

Spousal Support: The Spousal Support Advisory Guidelines

Spousal support is often a very contentious issue on separation as it has a much more subjective approach than child support.  A lot more factors go into determining a spousal support amount and there is no hard and fast rule on how it is to be calculated.  The government has provided a set of guidelines called the Spousal Support Advisory Guidelines (“SSAG”), but not even this is followed strictly.  Sometimes a judge may just pick a number they feel is appropriate having looked at all the factors.

What will follow is an overview on how spousal support is generally approached via the SSAG so that you have a good background on the general principles behind its calculation.

Under the SSAG there are two ways of calculating spousal support: the with child support formula and the without child support formula.

Please keep in mind that the following examples are not accurate calculations but approximations for educational purposes.

 

With Child Support Formula

With this formula, you look at the following factors:

  1. Gross income
  2. Child support being paid
  3. 7 expenses being paid
  4. Taxes and other deductions
  5. Government Benefits and credits
  6. Length of the marriage and/or cohabitation
  7. Age of children
  8. Recipient needs
  9. Ability of payor to pay

What we need to do is look at the amount that should be paid and how long it should be paid.  When calculating spousal support you usually come up with a range and determine where in that range you should fall.

Step 1: Calculating the spousal support amount

Start by determining your gross income, which is your income before taxes and other deductions are applied.  Then you subtract child support (or add it if you are the recipient), taxes and other deductions.  Finally, you add back any government benefits and credits that may apply.  This initial calculation will provide you with your Individual Net Disposable Income (“INDI”).  See the example below for a couple with 2 children who cohabited for 2 years before being married for 10 years.

Malik’s Monthly Gross income $125,000/12

=$10,417

Child support for 2 children in Ontario (see post on child support for information on how to determine child support) $1,777
Taxes paid ~30% $10,417*30% = $3,125
Malik’s INDI Calculation

Monthly Gross income

-Child support

-Taxes

(No benefits or credits to apply)

 

$10,417

-$1,777

-$3,125

 $0

$5,515

Malik has an INDI of $5,515.  Next we move on to the recipient, a similar formula with a little bit of a difference.

Nubia’s Monthly Gross income $50,000/12

= $4,167

Child support received $1,777
Taxes paid ~20% $4,167 * 20% = $833
Benefits Recieved $651
Nubia’s INDI Calculation

Monthly Gross income

+ Child support

-Taxes

+ Benefits and Credits

 

$4,167

$1,777

-$833

$651

$5,762

With both INDI’s known we add them together: $5,515 + $5,762 = $11,277 total

Since Nubia has both children living with her, Malik pays spousal support that would put Nubia within the 54-60% range of the total (note: this number changes depending on how many children are living with the recipient, if it was only one child the recipient might receive anywhere from 45-50% of the combined INDI).  For example:

  • Nubia is the recipient
  • 54-60% of $11,277 = $6,089 to $6,766

We now subtract Nubia’s INDI from these amounts to see what spousal support could be paid:

  • $6,089 – $5,762 = $327
  • $6,766 – $5,762 = $1,004

Nubia’s spousal support could then range from $327 to $1,004 monthly in order to bring her to that 54-60% share.  We use the factors mentioned above to determine where in that range she should fall and this is done on a case by case basis with need being one of the most important factors.

How long is spousal support supposed to be paid?

The upper part of the range is the length of the marriage or the date the last or youngest child finishes high school; the lower range is half the length of the marriage or the date the youngest child starts full time school.  Generally, only the length of the relationship is used and I will continue with that in mind.  We could simplify as follows: length of marriage * 0.5-1.  For Nubia and Malik’s relationship of 12 years, that would be a range from 6-12 years.

All this does is give us another set of ranges to make a decision with.  So how do we know WHERE within the range we should ultimately be?

There are multiple factors that are considered to determine where to fall within the range.  These can include:

  1. Compensatory claims
    1. The recipient needs (limited income earning capacity or age a factor here)
    2. Age, number, needs and standards of living children. Are there any special needs?
  2. Needs and ability to pay of Payor
    1. Consider meaningful access by Payor
  3. Work incentives for Payor
    1. Consider net income and out of pocket costs
  4. Property division and debts
  5. Self-sufficiency incentives
  6. Compelling Financial Circumstances
  7. Debt payment – used where negative net worth and one spouse paying disproportionate share
  8. Prior support obligations
  9. Illness and Disability

For example, if there are no special needs of the children, Malik has no concerns regarding his ability to pay, he has no other support obligations, and Nubia has no significant need for the money, Nubia would likely receive the lower end of support being 6 years.  Again, this is all hypothetical and each situation can vary.  Also, there are different formulas depending on whether there is shared custody, split custody, step children, adult children and more.

 

Without Child Support Formula

This is similar to the with child formula as you start with the same values.  How you calculate the actual payment is different though.  The range here is 1.5-2%, times the income difference between the spouse’s gross income, times the years of cohabitation to a maximum of 50% of that income difference.

Here is what that looks like:

Malik’s Gross income $10,417
Nubia’s Gross Income $4,167
Income Difference $10,417

– $4,167

$6,250

Years of cohabitation 2 years cohabited

10 years married

12 years total cohabitation

Notice here we do not subtract any taxes or any other deductions here.  We now have the numbers we need in order to perform the next step of the calculation (note that this is just one method of doing the calculation):

  • Convert the percentages into decimals: 1.5% = 0.015 and 2% = 0.02
  • Multiply these decimals by the difference in income
    • 0.015 * $6,250 = $94
    • 0.02 * $6,250 = $125
  • Finally, multiply these final numbers by the years of cohabitation:
    • 94 * 12 = $1128
    • 125 * 12 = $1500

This gives you a range of spousal support to be paid from $1128 to $1500 monthly.  Alternatively, you could multiply 1.5-2% by the years of cohabitation then just multiply those numbers by the income difference and you would reach the same result.

Isn’t math fun?

Is the duration or payment different with this formula?

Somewhat.  The duration is 0.5 to 1 for each year of cohabitation only (no child factors to consider here).  Duration is indefinite if the marriage is 20 years or longer, OR if the marriage lasted 5 years or longer when years of marriage and age of support recipient at separation total 65 or more.

So in our example the range is from 6 years to 12 years of support payments.

Otherwise the same factors mentioned above that can affect the duration of support can apply here as well.

Is there a deadline to Apply for Spousal Support?

Under s. 16(1)(c) of the Limitation Act, there is no deadline (or limitation period) to apply for spousal support.  However, need is a prominent factor in determining how much support to award.  If a spouse waits too long and a court deems that they are financially stable enough to not need support, it may not be awarded at all.

If you have any questions or concerns regarding support in your circumstances, give the experts at Rabideau Law a call to see how we can help.