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Working with an Estate Planning Lawyer

You’ve finally decided that you are ready to put together an estate plan (preparation of wills, trusts, and power of attorneys etc.) but are not sure about what the process will involve.

Here’s a quick list of some items that you should be prepared for:

Get specific about your assets

  • There’s no estate plan without discussing financials. All assets need to be considered and reviewed along with designations which may need to be changed, updated, or revised. These include not only your home, investments, shares, or bank accounts but also things like life insurance policies, registered plans etc. Not giving these items attention could lead to problems.

Get clear on what you want

  • Who should inherit your assets after you pass away?
  • Who should be looking after your affairs (funeral, debts, taxes, administration and distribution).
  • Who is the best suited to look after your minor or dependent children?
  • Should you consider an insurance trust agreement in order to provide further protection?
  • Are certain life-interest trusts or spousal trusts (possibly in a second-marriage scenario) required to further protect what you’ve earned and to ensure that not only is your spouse is protected during his or her lifetime but the capital of the trust is reserved for other persons?

Get the right opinion

  • You likely have some thoughts on your plan and who it should benefit but aren’t sure about the right way of bringing them to life. The best way to sort out is to speak to a professional (lawyer, financial advisor, and accountant) with a focus in this area. An opinion from a qualified professional is invaluable in making the decisions that suit your needs and protect your assets.

Get writing

  • Generally, the first step is for you to fill out a questionnaire to provide personal information in order for us to be able to assess your needs and tailor the plan accordingly.

The above is only a general idea of what is involved. Feel free to call us to get the process underway.

Disclaimer: The above is for informational purposes only and does not serve as legal advice. Please speak to your lawyer to better assess your specific situation and estate planning needs.

Joining Assets with Children

We recently came across an individual asking whether he could avoid the cost of preparing a Will by simply ‘joining’ all his assets with his children. Perhaps you may also have someone give you such an idea in order to skip the preparation of a Will because it’s “easier and cheaper to just join your accounts” than to visit the lawyer’s office.  

Interesting but misinformed.  

While joint ownership is often used as an estate planning tool in order to have assets transferred to the surviving owner (or simply for the sake of convenience) and avoiding the dreaded probate tax upon death, it has to be thought through to avoid unintended results.

Some questions that should be crossing your mind are:

  • Who is this account to be shared with?
  • Is the co-owner of the account one of your adult children?
  • What type of account is it (registered, non-registered etc.)?
  • Are there rollovers available so that there isn’t unnecessary tax burden on the estate?
  • Do you know the tax consequences that arise as a result of transferring a capital asset into joint ownership? 
  • Is the underlying intention to avoid probate tax?
  • Is avoiding probate tax worth the loss of control?
  • Is the true legal and beneficial ownership being transferred?

Some additional considerations may include the following:

In the event of your death, are you certain that Johnny will share equally with your other son, Bobby?  Maybe he will, maybe he won’t. Johnny may be in a financial strife and decide to use the proceeds out of this account thereby cutting Bobby short. What if Johnny’s facing creditor issues? Will creditors now be able to access the account? Do either of them have dependants (children, spouse) and how does all that factor in?

Along with continuous changes in the law, the above are some of the questions one must seek answers to in relation to joining accounts. Other items that require attention when preparing Wills are registered plans, insurance proceeds payable upon death, joint ownership designations, assets owned under tenancy in common etc.

It is always a good idea to speak to a professional and have your situation reviewed. Contact Rabideau Law today and speak to one of our professional Wills and Estates Lawyers.